London South Bank University`s Drama Society performs “SEPTEM”

Six actors and one pill, the outstanding drama performance of SEPTEM  by the Drama Society of London South Bank University has left the audience speechless.

On the 29th of November, the Drama Society of LSBU has come together to perform the SEPTEM, which was originally a movie but the director Annie Moohan decided to make a play out of it. The play was written by Hazel Hayes and Sammy Paul.

Introducing the play with: “In front of you is a pill… If after twenty-five minutes nobody has taken it, you will all die. Survivors will win their share of fifty million pounds. Good Luck.” gives the audience already a clue how this will end, but it does not mean that the tension is gone immediately. Throughout the play, the actors would always manage to get the audience involved emotionally and with this sense of humour some sort of dark, some sort of dry humour. When it came close to an end, there was no holding back anymore. I sat in my chair holding on to it as I was so spellbound by the acting and the plot of the play.

Later I spoke to Jack Cooke, he played Trevor in the play and he said that he enjoyed working with the other cast and he also found it good that first, second and third years were playing together as he can learn a lot from the other actors in the Drama Society

The play was held at London South Bank University-Borough road 103,          SE1 0AA in Studio 6, admission was although a small donation for the Drama Society was suggested.

Artists and Society

“An exhibition not as usual” 14 rooms with over a 150 paintings about Artists and Society

The exhibition Artists and Society is displayed in the famous Tate Modern Gallerie on Southbank in London. It is open to anyone and the admission is free. Sculptures, photographs, paintings, prints, videos, posters and blackboards with notes on them are displayed in 14 rooms each with a different them. Nathan (24) said: “It is so wide-ranged, so unusual and also timeless” Famous artists such as Picasso and Joseph Beuys displayed their works in the exhibition. The artworks in the exhibition are often critical against society and let the visitor think. 

Some very critical works where displayed others just people in their daily life and with others you had to go a lot more into detail. Torrie Gabb said that she looked at the picture and after reading the description of the art-works she felt a lot more different about it. 

The exhibition was very well visited and a lot of people were very interested. As the exhibition is displayed over so many rooms and in between you have movies which are from five to ten minutes it is suggested that to visit the exhibition you will need more than an hour.

Migration hidden beneath Tate Modern’s latest Exhibition

Migration hidden beneath Tate Modern’s latest Exhibition

Heat-sensitive material accompanied with a ‘crying’ room are apart of the latest exhibition at The Tate Modern with the intention to make visitors ‘uncomfortable’ and highlight the journey migrants take.  

Tate Modern’s Turbine hall flooring is covered in heat-sensitive material, commissioned by Hyundai. Hiding beneath it is a portrait of Yousef, a young Syrian man who fled to the UK in 2011 and is now a biomedical science student working for the NHS.

A low-frequency sound is constantly being played in the Turbine hall, as well as a ‘crying’ room with an organic compound that physically makes the visitor cry – both designed to make the visitors feel uncomfortable. Tania calls it ‘forced empathy’ and is intended to break down peoples usual social barriers as well as saying ‘Life is not comfortable. I want people to get out of their comfort zone’.

With this exhibition, Tania aims to create awareness about the positive aspects of migration by bringing people together to reveal the portrait of Yousef.

The purpose of the crying room is to make people think about the loss migration involves. Entering the room, visitors are stamped with a 12 digit number, representing the number of migration plus the number of migrant deaths both in 2018. Based on these numbers, an ever-changing title is created as the migration and deaths change (currently 10,143,225).

Speaking to local visitors, Nicholas Morgan and Jeni Godwin, they stated that they felt that it was powerful to look down on the entire portrait from the viewing platform. However, they said they felt “no sense of anything”, not understanding the link between the three parts of the exhibition and feeling “disappointed”.   

Is Tania Bugeras message truly conveyed in this abstract new piece of art? Or has her message been lost in Tanias key beliefs being misconstrued? Find out for yourself by visiting the Tate before the closing date on February 24th 2019.    

A Silver screen scene

 

Inside the Exhibition, showcasing the definitive movie requisites from the past fifty years.

Today an Iconic Exhibition has found its end in the BFI Imax, in Waterloo, London. Many tourists but also natives have come to visit the Exhibition of Hollywood’s famous film requisites. The Hoverboard from Back to the Future and the Han solo Jacket where displayed for two weeks. For the last five consecutive years, the BFI Imax has played host to the entrainment memorabilia auction, where over six hundred Hollywood costumes and props are sold to buyers across the globe. However, only the most pinioned garments are on display for the general public.

 

Aretha, a student from London said that she admired the display of the Harry Potter book, which was signed by the Actors. Another visitor, Steve was eying up to an original Star Wars film poster and he was planning to go to the auction to buy this poster.

The Auction that took place earlier cemented the value of some of these items; for instance, a life-size statue of Edward Scissorhands was sold for £65,000.

Although the showcase was appreciated by its visitors, what the event was lacking was publicity. Most of the visitors were from London. Furthermore, it still proved to be very popular, because it ran every day from 10 am to 9.30pm.