Ownership IS the decisive influence

I would like to use Edward Bernays noted as the godfather of PR and propaganda as cornerstone example of how corporations use power and resource to attempt to influence society.

There are many things said about Mr. Bernays but first lets draw for his own words on the media with an excerpt from one of his own Journals titled, ‘The engineering of consent’. he said”Words hammer continually at the eyes and ears of America. The United States has become a small 

room in which a single whisper is magnified thousands of times”.

“In certain cases, democratic leaders must play their part in leading the public through the engineering of consent to socially constructive goals and values”.

The engineering of consent by Edward L. Bernays, 

first published:1945 re published: 1955

  • Stats on commercial media
  •  Specialised media owned and operated by the many organised groups in the United States.
  • The engineering of consent as a theory and practical manipulation tool

“Words hammer continually at the eyes and ears of America. The United States has become a small room in which a single whisper is magnified thousands of times. Knowledge of how to use this enormous amplifying system becomes a matter of primary concern to those who are interested in socially constructive action. There are two main divisions of this communications system which maintain social cohesion. On the first level there are the commercial media. Almost 1,800 daily newspapers in the United States have a combined circulation of around 44,000,000. There are approximately 10,000 weekly newspapers and almost 6,000 magazines. Approximately 2,000 radio stations of various types broadcast to the Nation’s 60,000,000 receiving sets. Approximately 16,500 motion picture houses have a capacity of almost 10,500,000. A deluge of books and pamphlets is published annually. The country is blanketed with billboards, handbills, throwaways, and direct mail advertising. Round tables, panels and forums, classrooms and legislative assemblies, and public platforms—any and all media, day after day, spread the word, someone’s word. On the second level there are the specialized media owned and operated by the many organized groups in this country. Almost all such groups (and many of their subdivisions) have their own communications systems. They disseminate ideas not only by means of the formal written word in labor papers, house organs, special bulletins, and the like, but also through lectures, meetings, discussions, and rank and-file conversations.”