Infographics and the State of the Union Speeches

An example of ways that infographics can be presented - Photo Credits to Almariel1 on Pixabay
An example of ways that infographics can be presented - Photo Credits to Almariel1 on Pixabay

The Washington Post interactive dataset about Bill Clinton and the words he used in an annual address to Congress that no other president had used. This is interesting as the public would want to know why he is the only president to use these words and what context he had used them under as many of these words would tend to stand out alone. It would also be interesting to know why they chose these words to highlight and whether there were other words that Clinton alone had used in his addresses. The interactive sense of the data makes senses as it was published by a newspaper and they tend to give the public general information and leave it up to them to find out more about the story.  

The Vox diagram uses columns to illustrate the word count of presidential speeches at the State of the Union Congress. This method although still interactive data visualisation, is easier to interpret as you can explicitly see the varying numbers. As the chart also shows you the years in which the speeches took place, the reader can clearly conceive that the events of the year would have an impact of the length of the speech. This is also the best way to present numerical information concisely.  

Columns were also used by the New York Times to illustrate the key themes of presidential speeches. This dataset is very clear as not only does it show the President in power at each of the speeches, but the interactivity allows consumers to see the amount of times a phrase was used and the year. This also allows them to make connections to what was happening in society at that time. This dataset differs from the others as it includes a split view of both the republicans and the democrats – leading viewers to believe that this is a nonbiased data set.