The Audio Production Awards 2017

The Audio Production Awards were bigger and better this year, being presented by MBE Trevor Nelson and supported by celebrity guests such as politician Ed Miliband and Nick Grimshaw.

With 23 award categories to get through the night kicked off with the award for ‘creative documentary feature maker’ won by Hanna Walker Brown. Followed by ‘Best Comedy Producer’ with the award going to Matt strong, his work being described as “mastery of both established and new programs” with the runners up, Benjamin Partriqge taking the silver and David Tyler coming up third with bronze.

A heart felt speech followed from Dotun Adebayo, a regular presenter on BBC radio 5, who thanked his wife and children for helping him with his career and helping him win his first award, before leaving the stage teary eyed.

The final award was presented to PRA Productions for the ‘indie of the year’ award.

Despite the event running out of the complimentary food and drink before we arrived and the slightly rude presenter Sonali Shah who insulted a percentage of the audience with her jokes about students, the night ran smoothly with entertainers such as Richard jones, a Britains got talent winner, performing magic tricks on stage and the winners and runners up leaving with smiles and sparkly glass awards in hand.

Jauz at Electric Brixton

Jauz played at electric Brixton last Friday supported by Sente, Holy Goof, Grand Theft and Darkzy, in an event run by the popular UKF music brand.

For anyone who has a love for bassline this was the place to be and it didn’t disappoint, with the artists playing from 10pm until 4am, despite the event having been advertised to run until 6 am, a crowd of over 1000 people, and a mass of cheap drinks, the atmosphere was described as “insane” on Skiddle reviews along with being rated 5 star.

Having queued for over an hour to get into the arena, we were able to catch the last 20 minutes of holy goofs set, where remixes of Katy B’s ‘on a mission’ were played and holy goof originals such as ‘eyes on you’. Following this was the artist grand theft, who despite being announced as a special guest was practically shunned off stage at the end of his set with the crowd’s huge anticipation for the main artist Jauz to get on the stage and play his set.

Matching the audience’s anticipation Jauz took to the stage with confetti and exploding from the ceiling onto the crowd as the beat dropped in the first song, sending the audience bouncing and flying in all directions in the mosh pits that opened up. Despite Darkzy being a favourite artist of mine sadly his set just couldn’t follow that of Jauz being slightly dull in comparison, with a fair amount of the crowd heading home during the middle of his set.

Restaurant Wahaca – Review

Wahaca, a Mexican street food restaurant founded by Master Chef winner Thomasina Miers. Being located on the South bank directly facing the river Wahaca offers beautiful river side views while you dine on authentic Mexican street food, accompanied with music, out door seating and probably the best guacamole you will ever taste.

Being made up of huge metal shipping containers the unusual exterior of the restaurant unlike any place I have encountered before is possibly the reason for drawing in so many customers, with waits of up to an hour for a seat, completely worth it however as the food and cocktails match up to the restaurants reputation, offering all traditional Mexican street food such as enchiladas, burritos and a creamy guacamole made with fresh avocado, salt limes onions and a mix of herbs.

Inside the multi-coloured storage exterior lies an abundance of fairy lights, posters and buntings all following the Mexican theme, with friendly and fast service from experienced waiters, a drinks list ranging from tequila shots, to cocktail pitchers, to wines, beers and spirits, practically any alcohol that takes your fancy.

All courses and drinks are reasonably priced, a starter, main course with extras, and a drink can cost under £20 and guarantee to have you completely stuffed by the time you leave.

 

Park’s Edge Bar and Kitchen now Open – NIB

Parks Edge Bar and Kitchen has opened its doors. With a combination of British and fusion foods aiming to introduce locals to a whole new flavour pallet, along with a seasonally changing menu to accommodate the restaurants use of locally sourced ingredients. Created from scratch my head chef Tom Spinks and his team.

The seemingly endless list of wines from around the world and leading British wines highlights not only the food but also the elegant and modern décor and location of the restaurant, being situated on the edge of Brockwell Park overlooking both the park and the lido.

To cater to a range of people the restaurants menu offers a range of vegan and vegetarian options along side the vast choice of meat options also provided.

With starters being priced at as little as £5.50 and mains beginning at £11 the restaurant is sure to be welcomed by locals providing another option for cost effective dining.

The Parks Edge Bar and Kitchen is open Tuesday to Sunday, offering lunch from 12pm to 3pm and will serve dinner from 5:30pm until 10pm mid week and later on weekends.

Bookings and reservations can be made via the website or by calling on 020 8671 0306.

 

Camdens Vintage Scene

Camden town, renowned for its quirky stores, costume shops, and alternative scene. With stores such as Rokit, Fat Faced Cat, and the infamous Camden market bringing in the vintage scene for buyers with an edgy clothing taste, wanting something different and unique, independent retailers are flooding in bringing pop up vintage fairs.

This weekend, the Camden Vintage Kilo Sale took place at cecil sharp house, a one day pop up event bringing a range of retro and 90s style vintage clothes to be brought at the cheap cost of £15 a kilo. Dozens of clothing racks all packed to breaking point with denim, suede, rave and fur jackets, levi jeans, shirts, tops, leather and metalic skirts. All completley unique an aspect that average vintage clothing stores somewhat lack.

Despite having to rummage through some very questionable colour choices and clothes that should have definitley stayed in the year they came from, the rare style and quality of the clothes makes the long process worth it, with myself coming out of the event with four items costing just £20 .

With such low cost vintage pop up events with a huge range of items, happening on a monthly basis, street stores such as Rokit will definitly struggle to keep up.