Alcohol consumption in Europe

Europe is the highest drinking continents consuming much more alcohol annually than most places to date, and these statistics are only increasing as time goes by.

The idea for my infographic was to compare the top five European countries with the highest ranking GDP and then the countries with lowest ranking GDP per capita. I wanted to serif there was a clear different or any anomalies, or even some sort of pattern. I chose to only pick the top 5 richest and poorest countries in Europe rather than all countries because in 2010 Europe took all top 10 places in the worlds alcohol consumption and has continued to hold these 10 spots up to 2016 with Belarus at the top with an average of 17.5 litres of pure alcohol per person anually. Coming in at a close second for the highest drinking country is Moldova with an average of 16.8 litres.

I found this interesting because although Belarus wasn’t in either of the top 5 GDP ranking it still falls very close to the one of the lowest in Europe along with Moldova witch is right at the bottom as at poorest country in Europe. Along with these two in the top 10 the Ukraine is also in there with an average of 13.9 litres per person, again another one of the poorer countries. These numbers shocked me because the average alcohol intake annually is estimated at 6.2 litres. Once I saw that most of the highest amounts of alcohol being consumed was in the poorer countries with Ireland being the only richer country in the top 10 highest drinking countries in 2015 to 2016. I began to wonder why this might be, looking into the price difference for alcohol between each end for the GDP rankings, sure enough the in the poorer countries alcohol seems to be cheeper, not by too much though therefore I looked at the average age that consumed the most alcohol in the year. From this it looked like in the top 5 richer countries, younger people (16 to 30) were consuming more alcohol implying that it may mostly be binge drinking, however in the 5 poorer countries the consumption seemed to be spread over a all ages which may give some explanation to why their alcohol intake is higher.

There are plenty of different factors that might explain why each country may have different drinking habits, like culture, media consumption and religion. Although there isn’t a massive difference between the rich and poor countries alcohol consumption as both drink more than the average there is a slight pattern with the poorer countries drinking more there are a couple that don’t follow this pattern, for example Azerbaijan and Armenia don’t seem to drink nearly as much as most of the other countries with a lower GDP and the countries with a higher GDP all seem to have a steady similar lever of consumption.

idea for my infographic was to compare the top five European countries with the highest ranking GDP and then the countries with lowest ranking GDP per capita. I wanted to serif there was a clear different or any anomalies, or even some sort of pattern. I chose to only pick the top 5 richest and poorest countries in Europe rather than all countries because in 2010 Europe took all top 10 places in the worlds alcohol consumption and has continued to hold these 10 spots up to 2016 with Belarus at the top with an average of 17.5 litres of pure alcohol per person anually. Coming in at a close second for the highest drinking country is Moldova with an average of 16.8 litres.

I found this interesting because although Belarus wasn’t in either of the top 5 GDP ranking it still falls very close to the one of the lowest in Europe along with Moldova witch is right at the bottom as at poorest country in Europe. Along with these two in the top 10 the Ukraine is also in there with an average of 13.9 litres per person, again another one of the poorer countries. These numbers shocked me because the average alcohol intake annually is estimated at 6.2 litres. Once I saw that most of the highest amounts of alcohol being consumed was in the poorer countries with Ireland being the only richer country in the top 10 highest drinking countries in 2015 to 2016. I began to wonder why this might be, looking into the price difference for alcohol between each end for the GDP rankings, sure enough the in the poorer countries alcohol seems to be cheeper, not by too much though therefore I looked at the average age that consumed the most alcohol in the year. From this it looked like in the top 5 richer countries, younger people (16 to 30) were consuming more alcohol implying that it may mostly be binge drinking, however in the 5 poorer countries the consumption seemed to be spread over a all ages which may give some explanation to why their alcohol intake is higher.

There are plenty of different factors that might explain why each country may have different drinking habits, like culture, media consumption and religion. Although there isn’t a massive difference between the rich and poor countries alcohol consumption as both drink more than the average there is a slight pattern with the poorer countries drinking more there are a couple that don’t follow this pattern, for example Azerbaijan and Armenia don’t seem to drink nearly as much as most of the other countries with a lower GDP and the countries with a higher GDP all seem to have a steady similar lever of consumption.

idea for my infographic

Europe is the highest drinking continents consuming much more alcohol annually than most places to date, and these statistics are only increasing as time goes by.

The idea for my infographic was to compare the top five European countries with the highest ranking GDP and then the countries with lowest ranking GDP per capita. I wanted to serif there was a clear different or any anomalies, or even some sort of pattern. I chose to only pick the top 5 richest and poorest countries in Europe rather than all countries because in 2010 Europe took all top 10 places in the worlds alcohol consumption and has continued to hold these 10 spots up to 2016 with Belarus at the top with an average of 17.5 litres of pure alcohol per person anually. Coming in at a close second for the highest drinking country is Moldova with an average of 16.8 litres.

I found this interesting because although Belarus wasn’t in either of the top 5 GDP ranking it still falls very close to the one of the lowest in Europe along with Moldova witch is right at the bottom as at poorest country in Europe. Along with these two in the top 10 the Ukraine is also in there with an average of 13.9 litres per person, again another one of the poorer countries. These numbers shocked me because the average alcohol intake annually is estimated at 6.2 litres. Once I saw that most of the highest amounts of alcohol being consumed was in the poorer countries with Ireland being the only richer country in the top 10 highest drinking countries in 2015 to 2016. I began to wonder why this might be, looking into the price difference for alcohol between each end for the GDP rankings, sure enough the in the poorer countries alcohol seems to be cheeper, not by too much though therefore I looked at the average age that consumed the most alcohol in the year. From this it looked like in the top 5 richer countries, younger people (16 to 30) were consuming more alcohol implying that it may mostly be binge drinking, however in the 5 poorer countries the consumption seemed to be spread over a all ages which may give some explanation to why their alcohol intake is higher.

There are plenty of different factors that might explain why each country may have different drinking habits, like culture, media consumption and religion. Although there isn’t a massive difference between the rich and poor countries alcohol consumption as both drink more than the average there is a slight pattern with the poorer countries drinking more there are a couple that don’t follow this pattern, for example Azerbaijan and Armenia don’t seem to drink nearly as much as most of the other countries with a lower GDP and the countries with a higher GDP all seem to have a steady similar lever of consumption.
 was to compare the top five European countries with the highest ranking GDP and then the countries with lowest ranking GDP per capita. I wanted to serif there was a clear different or any anomalies, or even some sort of pattern. I chose to only pick the top 5 richest and poorest countries in Europe rather than all countries because in 2010 Europe took all top 10 places in the worlds alcohol consumption and has continued to hold these 10 spots up to 2016 with Belarus at the top with an average of 17.5 litres of pure alcohol per person anually. Coming in at a close second for the highest drinking country is Moldova with an average of 16.8 litres.

I found this interesting because although Belarus wasn’t in either of the top 5 GDP ranking it still falls very close to the one of the lowest in Europe along with Moldova witch is right at the bottom as at poorest country in Europe. Along with these two in the top 10 the Ukraine is also in there with an average of 13.9 litres per person, again another one of the poorer countries. These numbers shocked me because the average alcohol intake annually is estimated at 6.2 litres. Once I saw that most of the highest amounts of alcohol being consumed was in the poorer countries with Ireland being the only richer country in the top 10 highest drinking countries in 2015 to 2016. I began to wonder why this might be, looking into the price difference for alcohol between each end  for the GDP rankings, sure enough the in the poorer countries alcohol seems to be cheeper, not by too much though therefore I looked at the average age that consumed the most alcohol in the year. From this it looked like in the top 5 richer countries, younger people (16 to 30) were consuming more alcohol implying that it may mostly be binge drinking, however in the 5 poorer countries the consumption seemed to be spread over a all ages which may give some explanation to why their alcohol intake is higher. 

There are plenty of different factors that might explain why each country may have different drinking habits, like culture, media consumption and religion. Although there isn’t a massive difference between the rich and poor countries alcohol consumption as both drink more than the average there is a slight pattern with the poorer countries drinking more there are a couple that don’t follow this pattern, for example Azerbaijan and Armenia don’t seem to drink nearly as much as most of the other countries with a lower GDP and the countries with a higher GDP all seem to have a steady similar lever of consumption.